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Making yoghurt at home made easy

Making yoghurt is simple and easy. Most likely you have all the main ingredients and equipment that you need to make a good and tasty yoghurt in your kitchen.

Requirements to make yorghurt.

1. Full fat Milk, cow’s milk is the best -2 litres. The amount of milk depends on the amount of yoghurt you want to make.
2. Cooking pots
3. A cup of plain yoghurt
4. Sugar
5.Flavor or fruits

Steps in Making Yoghurt
1. Boil the milk. (If you have a thermometer, check the temperature to maintain at 72 °C for atleast three minutes).

2. Add sugar (not necessary-its unhealthy).

3. Cool down the milk to between 35-40 °C. Cooling the milk can be achieved by transferring milk to a clean container and placing the container with milk in a cold water bath. Again check the temperature with at thermometer. If you have no thermometer, do not worry, check the temperature with the back of your palm. If the temperature is not scalding, it is most likely ok.

4. Add the plain yoghurt. This acts a culturing bacteria. -If you can afford, buy freeze dried culture bacteria, but they are not necessary.

5.Incubate the milk at  35-40 °C for atleast 7 hours (I used to prepare milk in the evening and incubate at night) . To maintain 35-40 °C, place the cultured milk in a cooking pot with warm water. The warm water will cool down with time, so change water after every hour.

-Incubation helps bacteria from plain yoghurt to breakdown the sugar in milk (lactose) and produce acid (lactic acid). The acid lowers the pH of milk causing it to coagulate hence forming thick yoghurt.

6. After 7 hours, scope some yoghurt and taste to check the texture and flavour of your yorghurt. The longer you incubate the yoghurt, the more it becomes thicker. However, it should not be incubated more than 12 hours.

7. If the texture of your yoghurt is thick, it means the yoghurt is ready for taking.  Congratulations! you have successfully made yoghurt.

Transfer the yoghurt to clean containers and refrigerate. The yoghurt should be consumed within a week.

Adding flavour and fruits
If you would like to have some flavour or fruits, add them at this stage and stir very slowly then refrigerate your yoghurt.

Making yoghurt in future

Keep some of your un-flavoured yoghurt to use in future as the culturing yoghurt. This will save you from buying plain yoghurt.

Advantages of making home yoghurt
1. Save money
2. You can add flavour and fruit of your choice.
3. You can make yoghurt whenever you want.

I really love questions, send them my way.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Caroline Kanana Kimiri June 23, 2010, 10:43 am

    thax. must practice that

  • Jedidah Ataya Macharia June 23, 2010, 10:47 am

    I must try it out i just hope it will work out!

  • Joshua Arimi June 23, 2010, 10:53 am

    @Carol and Jedidah, please try it and let me know what happens. I kindly request.

  • Joshua Arimi June 23, 2010, 10:53 am

    @Carol and Jedidah, please try it and let me know what happens. I kindly request.

  • Norah Murugi Nyaga June 23, 2010, 11:59 am

    u remind me of JKUAT days and the labs. great gd day

  • Winnie Ngubwa June 23, 2010, 12:23 pm

    Joshua. Thanx 4 this artical.but how can i make the plain yoghurt?

  • Favoured Estar June 23, 2010, 12:57 pm

    Great article

  • Esther Mukoya Chi-Gwada June 23, 2010, 12:57 pm

    Great article

  • Joshua Arimi June 23, 2010, 1:48 pm

    Thanks all. @ Winnie, for the first time, buy a plain yoghurt. After making yoghurt, use your own unflavoured yoghurt as the starter culture. Should you wish not to use plain yoghurt, buy freeze dried culturing lactic acid bacteria.

  • Joshua Arimi June 23, 2010, 1:48 pm

    Thanks all. @ Winnie, for the first time, buy a plain yoghurt. After making yoghurt, use your own unflavoured yoghurt as the starter culture. Should you wish not to use plain yoghurt, buy freeze dried culturing lactic acid bacteria.

  • Winnie Ngubwa June 23, 2010, 2:08 pm

    Thanks Joshua. This will be a sure way to save money now that my boys like it very much.

  • Winnie Ngubwa June 24, 2010, 9:00 am

    Has made my yoghurt yesterday night and it was wow in the morning. Had it 4 breakfast. Thanks 4 da info.

  • Joshua Arimi June 24, 2010, 9:25 am

    I am very pleased to hear that Winnie! I am looking forward to posting similar useful recipes at http://www.arimifoods.com/. If you want to be receiving all articles in your email, just subscribe @ http://www.arimifoods.com/ for free with your email. Again thanks

  • Joshua Arimi June 24, 2010, 9:25 am

    I am very pleased to hear that Winnie! I am looking forward to posting similar useful recipes at http://www.arimifoods.com/. If you want to be receiving all articles in your email, just subscribe @ http://www.arimifoods.com/ for free with your email. Again thanks

  • Faith Maingi June 24, 2010, 2:51 pm

    This is wao! Even the children are happy. We can now afford it regulary. Thanks for sharing this.

  • mafie kennedy November 5, 2010, 11:16 am

    Hi,
    I have been so much interested in your information in the website.I have been thinking of the best way to help especially orphaned children centers by teaching them these techniques of making yogurt and other food things so that they can easily earn a living from the resources available locally.How can you help me in that Mr Arimi?
    am a technology teacher by the way.
    Can i have recipes and step by step instructions on how to make cakes,biscuits,etc
    kenmafie2008 skype
    Thanks

    • Joshua Arimi November 7, 2010, 10:50 pm

      Hi Mafie,
      Thanks for your comments. Actually I used to train Women in Meru on making those products. Where are you based? I can send you a manual with those recipes.
      All the best.

  • Healthpotent February 23, 2011, 6:59 am

    This is an awesome yourgurt recipe. I discovered this web site form a Daily Nation Publication on a study about Maasai. Am keen about lifestyle and healthy eating. so you can bet Am enjoying reading these posts. I also read in another article that yoghurt has ‘good bacteria’ which raises which acts as a probiotic.

    Keep up Arimi!

    Regards,
    Mike Ndegwa
    http://www.mikendegwa.com

    • Joshua Arimi February 23, 2011, 7:59 am

      Hi Mike,
      Yap, probiotic yoghurts have active bacteria that are very good for health. It is hypothesised that probiotic yoghurts help lower blood cholesterol, lower blood pressure, improve immmune system etc.

      I write something about probiotic yoghurt, that way, I will be able to cover all the health benefits in detail.

  • Lin June 29, 2011, 7:31 am

    Why the yogurt should not be incubated for more than 12 hours?

    • Joshua Arimi June 30, 2011, 7:20 am

      Hi Lin, Normally the cultures used for yoghurt making produce enough acid to coagulate milk within few hours. Long incubation periods may lead to growth of other unwanted bacteria and high acid production affecting the quality of the yoghurt.

  • sarah July 5, 2011, 2:26 pm

    Hi Arimi. I have often made yoghurt for my young ones using this method. Thanks for sharing. Like Mafie, i would wish to have the manual, please tell me what to do.
    Good day.

  • jane gathoni August 13, 2011, 9:08 pm

    hi i am making and packing yogurt in bottles for customers. but after like a week they swell in the bottle and become bad. what am i doing wrong? will greatly appreciate your help. also how long can yogurt keep unrefridgerated?
    jane

    • Joshua Arimi August 14, 2011, 7:11 pm

      Hi Jane,
      There is nothing wrong you are doing . Actually for yoghurt to keep for one week at ambient temperature is very long-especially in tropics where temperatures are above 25 C most of the time. Yoghurt is supposed to be refrigerated unless it is pasteurised or with preservatives (not allowed). Unrefrigerated youghurt can keep utmost 48 hours if it is to be safe. This is because long storage at ambient temperature may result to growth of pathogenic or poison producing bacteria. The bottles are swelling because of the gas produced by bacteria growing in the yoghurt.

  • jane August 29, 2011, 9:02 pm

    hi thanks for responding to my earlier question. i have another question please.. after packing and sealing the cups with yogurt using a foil, i realised that at the end of the day the foils had swelled yet the yogurt is very fresh.. why? the foils are sealed with a hot element.

    • Joshua Arimi September 7, 2011, 11:44 pm

      Hi Jane,
      The foils swell due to gas produced by the bacteria in the yoghurt. To avoid this you need cold storage. Several factors could be contributing to this. The environment temperature, the type and source of culture that you use and level of hygiene of your processing.

  • jane September 23, 2011, 12:21 pm

    Hi Arimi

    Why can i buy the culturing bacterias wholesale or retail? how much is it approximately? or is there a way of producing this at home i.e. back shed!

    • sam January 19, 2012, 8:10 am

      You can buy the yoghurt from the shops and use it as a starter or make your own starter by boiling the milk and keep it for 48 to 72 hours which will make it thicken and allow growth of bacteria.

  • cocotte July 12, 2012, 12:26 am

    Hi Arimi!
    Once made and packed in containers, how long max can this yogurt last in the fridge?
    Thanks for sharing this great recipe!

  • mrs mbae October 16, 2013, 10:56 am

    Hi son,
    Thanks a lot for your Yoghurt recipe,before i got a permanent job,i had a cow which used to give me high quality milk. I started processing yoghurt and sell, i realized yoghurt had more income than fresh milk,and i stopped selling fresh milk and surely i used to make money by selling to neighbors.These days i make for my family and they are very happy.
    Instead of waking at night to change water to maitain the temperature of 35-40 degree i normally keep in cooking basket at 8pm to 6am ,when i wake up i just stir n put the flavor and refrigerate .